A tall girl’s review of Netflix’s “Tall Girl” movie: Where it falls short

Clearly, I needed to watch this movie as duh, that’s me – the tall girl – but here I will give my honest review on Netflix’s new rom com, “Tall Girl” and where it hits close to heart, but of course, also falls short.

A quick summary of the plot: Jodi (played by Ava Michelle) is the tallest girl in her high school at 6’1″. She has always felt uncomfortable in her own skin. To add to it, she is endlessly mocked by her classmates for her height and tries to avoid attention at all costs – until Stig, the Swedish foreign exchange student, comes in.


This Netflix movie, as cheesy and exaggerated as it is, actually has pretty relatable parts. The classmates constantly ask Jodi, “How’s the weather up there?” and on a real note, I’ve only gotten that question two or three times. But if there is a routine question I would get, it would be “Do you play volleyball or basketball?” or “It must be hard finding a guy taller than you.”

If I’m going to share a secret, I did try out for my high school volleyball team and no, I did not make the cut. My poor hand-eye coordination led the ball to hit my face more than my hands.

Like Jodi, I was also uncomfortable in my skin being the tallest in my class from elementary school all the way to high school. I also nodded with knowing recognition when they did a flashback to Jodi being in the back for group school photos because I remember when that was me. And if there was ever a lunch line in grade school that had the kids line up by height, you know that I would never be the line leader.

It’s also true that being tall, I stayed away from high heels. As much as I secretly loved trying on my mom’s heels and flaunting a Tyra Banks walk in my home, I could never get the courage to wear them at school or just outside. And if there was a special occasion to wear them like prom, I would try to find the lowest heel possible to make sure my date didn’t feel self conscious.

Which brings me to my next point: boys.

It is with no doubt that I had a hard time finding a guy taller than me all throughout my life. In fact, when people asked me what my ideal type was I only had one criteria: over 6 feet (hey, I had to leave some room for me and my shoes). This image of my ‘ideal guy’ consumed me so much so, that the more time that I spent looking for someone taller and not finding ‘the one,’ the more I would hate myself and my height for it.

I had this cycle that would be on repeat: I blamed my parents initially. And then I blamed God for creating me like this. And then I blamed myself – I had so much self hate surrounding my 5’11” stature that I thought I would never find my person.

I also had a “I’ve been there!” moment when Jodi ended up Googling “height reduction surgery.” (And for all the curious, it is not just a costly procedure but a VERY intense one. I highly do not recommend looking into it!)

Where “Tall Girls” the movie falls short, though, is not the plot itself or the message it is trying to give to its audience, it is actually the love line. It is cringe-worthy. They have to keep it interesting all the while trying to make it high-school appropriate, and I think Jodi was almost forced into certain love lines to make a happy ending for the movie.

Another reason why the movie falls short is the lack of diversity. Other than the Black best friend who is confident in all the right ways, all the high schoolers are Caucasian and come from an affluent background (who drives BMW SUVs to school at 16?)


Overall, I enjoyed the movie as it touched on the ‘tall girl’ moments that no other movie has touched on: I do tend to slouch more, random branches on trees hit me more often on my run than they should, and pants are never going to be “ankle length.”

Although I sometimes still do feel awkward being that “tall Korean girl” today, I remind myself of how far I’ve come.

I embrace that I have hobbies beyond sports. I do a Tyra Banks walk in pants that only reach my calves (and dresses that are too short). And yes, I have a boyfriend who is shorter than me but I love that about him and I have a strong feeling he is ‘the one.’

This movie is not just for the tall girls – it’s for anyone who has insecurities. Everyone, and let me repeat everyone, has body issues. While you may feel ‘different,’ it is important you learn to love yourself.

For all the frustrations and challenges I dealt with (and am still dealing with) for being tall, I am at a point in my life where I am proud to be a tall Korean girl.


Watch the trailer below and the movie at Netflix, and comment on what you think!

Are long distance relationships worth it?

676 miles between us.
This equals 13 hours of driving (or 8.7 days of walking!)

I’m in Philadelphia and my boyfriend currently resides in Charleston. But this has not always been the case. Today marks 8 months of us being apart (physically).

Unless you start off on a dating site and find your significant other in a far away city or even country, going from being together 24/7 to once a month is a major transition that involves a lot of work, money, time on both parties.


One question I get a lot is, “Is it even worth it?”

Not going to lie, at first I was pretty pessimistic. I mean, you’re reading about a girl who literally required a good night cuddle to fall asleep every night. In addition to my needy self, I admit that I was jealous that I wasn’t the one moving – the one getting a fresh start in a new city. He was. He got a big promotion in his amazing company and a new field that he loved.

He was starting it in a city that ranked No. 1 U.S. city for the past seven years while I lived in a city that ranked the worst for sleep health(?!). I mean, c’mon.

Eventually, it took a physical toll. I tossed and tumbled in my sleep for weeks months on end. Aromatherapy, adult weight blankets, meditation, a warm shower before bed were initially successful but the effects never lasted. Leading my nightly sleep to average around 4 or 5 hours. (May be ‘normal’ to some, but to put it into perspective, if I get 8 hours of sleep I order a tall coffee from Starbucks while if I get half of that I need a Venti and possibly a good slap in the face by noon.)

I was sick of feeling that way – not just from the lack of sleep but from seeing couples walk by holding hands when the only thing in my hand was my iPhone, eating dinner alone, and not being able to enjoy a sunny day outside together.

My thoughts rapidly went from ‘man, long distance relationships are hard’ to ‘this long distance relationship is killing me.’

And by the third month, I wanted out.

I wanted out not because there were too many unresolved arguments between me and my boyfriend but because I became selfish.


If you’re currently in or are about to be in a long distance relationship, I urge you to ask: why are you really worried, and is the long distance relationship worth it?

For me, my trust for my boyfriend or myself never wavered. It was me saying “I can’t do this” before “this (long distance)” even began. Think about it: I slept great before I even met my boyfriend, why am I blaming him and his move for my lack of sleep?

My relationship CPR came from self-discovery and self-improvement practices that I carry to this day. It was from me passing couples all lovey dovey and knowing that I have a boyfriend who loves me just as much, Facetiming while cooking and eating dinner together, and being completely okay enjoying a sunny day outside by myself.

Are long distance relationships worth it?
Absolutely.

Fight for it. Fight for you and your partner – because distance is not why long distance relationships fail.